Print Page   |   Home   |   Sign In   |   Join
Parent Crisis Response Resources
Share |

Index:

Helping Your Child Cope with Tragedy
      By Age
     
General
     
Documents in Different Languages
Responding to Natural Disasters
Preparing Your Family for an Emergency

Disaster Distress Helpline   Call 1-800-985-5990 or text "TalkWithUs" to 66746.

The Disaster Distress Helpline, 1-800-985-5990, can provide immediate counseling to anyone who needs help in dealing with the many issues and problems that might arise from tragedy and traumatic events.   Sponsored by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), the Helpline immediately connects callers to trained and caring professionals from the closest crisis counseling center in the nationwide network of centers. Helpline staff will provide confidential counseling, referrals, and other needed support services.  The Disaster Distress Helpline is a 24-hours-a-day, 7-days-a-week national hotline dedicated to providing disaster crisis counseling. The toll-free Helpline is confidential and multilingual, and available for those who are experiencing psychological distress as a result of natural or man-made disasters, incidents of mass violence, or any other tragedy affecting America's communities.

Our texting service also is available to Spanish speakers. Text "Hablanos" to 66746 for 24/7 emotional support.    TTY for Deaf/Hearing Impaired: 1-800-846-8517

Helping Your Child Cope with Tragedy

Talking About Paris:

The world has again been shocked by the massive, senseless violence of terrorists.  The National Center for Crisis Bereavement has prepared a special resource:  The Paris Attacks - Parents’ Guide for Talking to their Children 

By Age: 

PreSchool:

Parent Tips for Helping Infants and Toddlers after Disasters   Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration

Parent Tips for Helping Pre-School Age Children after Disasters   Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration

Tips for Helping PreSchool and School Children After Disasters  National Center for Child Traumatic Stress

When Families Grieve: Sesame Street tackles the difficult topic of death and provides a number of resources and videos (in English, Spanish and with subtitles) of families' personal stories about coping with the death of a parent, as well as strategies that have helped these families move forward for both military and nonmilitary families.       Sesame Street

School Age:

Parent TIps for Helping School Age Children after Disasters  Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration

Adolescents:

Helping Children and Adolescents Cope with Violence and Disasters:  What Parents Can Do to Help    (20 pages, by age) National Institute of Mental Health

Parent Tips for Helping Adolescents after Disasters   Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration

Available in Spanish, Japanese & Chinese    (SAMHSA Parent Tips documents available in Spanish, Chinese & Japanese  from the Department of Education's Readiness & Emergency Management for Schools)

Parent Guidelines for Helping Youth after a Shooting   National Child Traumatic Stress Network

Responding to Media Coverage:

Helping Your Child Cope with Media Coverage After a Disaster  Parent Guide.  Terrorism and Disaster Center at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center

Tips for Parents on Media Coverage    National Child Traumatic Stress Network

Tip Sheet for Youth Talking to Journalists about the Shooting  National Child Traumatic Stress Network

General:

A National Tragedy:  Helping Children Cope   National Association of School Psychologists

After the Trauma:  Helping My Child Cope  UCLA Center of Mental Health in Schools

Caring for Kids After a School Shooting  short video by Paramjit Joshi, MD,  chair of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Children's National Medical Center in Washington, DC.  The Child Mind Institute

Childhood Traumatic Grief Educational Materials (For Parents)  (15 pages)  National Child Traumatic Stress Network

Common Reactions After Trauma  The National Center for Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

Coping with Crisis:  Helping Children with Special Needs  National Association of School Psychologists

Coping with Violence and Traumatic Events    Tips for parents in talking with their children by various age groups in English, Spanish, Chinese, and Japanese.    Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration

Guidelines for Working with Traumatized Children  

Helping Your Child After a Natural Disaster  
        Document available in English, Spanish, Portuguese, Chinese, Korean, Hmong, Haitian Creole, Tagalog, Tongan, Croatian, and Japanese   Translations provided to SSWAA by Melissa Allen Heath,   PhD, Brigham Young University

Helping Children Cope with Tragedy Related Anxiety  Mental Health America

 Helping your children manage distress in the aftermath of a shooting  American Psychological Association

How NOT to Talk With Children About the Newtown Shooting  By KJ DELL'ANTONIA,  December 17, 2012 The New York Times

Identifying Seriously Traumatized Children: Tips for Parents and Educators  National Association of School Psychologists

Managing Strong Emotional Reactions to Traumatic Events: Tips for Parents and Teachers    National Association of School Psychologists

Parent Guidelines for Helping Youth after the Recent Shooting   National Child Traumatic Stress Network

Psychological Impact of the Recent Shooting   National Child Traumatic Stress Network

Talking to Children about Community Violence    By David Fassler, M.D.

Talking to Children about the Shooting  National Child Traumatic Stress Network 

Talking to Children about School Shootings   American Psychological Association

Talking to Children About a Shooting     MassGeneral Hospital for Children

Talking to Children About Violence   National Association of School Psychologists

Tips for Supporting Children and Youth After a Crisis Event  National Association of School Psychologists

Tips for Survivors of a Disaster or Other Traumatic Event: Managing Stress  This publication provides easy to read stress prevention and management tips for dealing with the effects of trauma, mass violence, or terrorism; it lists tips to relieve stress, describes how to know when to seek professional help, and provides accompanying resources. (4 pages). Source:  SAMHSA

Tips for Survivors of a Disaster or Traumatic Event: What to Expect in Your Personal, Family, Work, and Financial Life   This publication offers self-help tips for coping with the aftermath of trauma; it discusses the long-term impact of trauma, including personal uncertainties, family relationship changes, work disruptions, and financial concerns.SAMHSA

Tips for College Students: After a Disaster or Other Trauma   This publication helps college students cope with the mental health effects in the aftermath of trauma; it explains normal reactions, emphasizes the importance of talking about feelings, and offers tips for coping. SAMHSA

Tips for College Students: After a Disaster or Other Trauma: R U A Survivor of a Disaster or Other Trauma?   This publication uses text-message shorthand to offer college students tips for coping after a disaster or other traumas; it describes ways students can cope with anxiety, fear, and sadness after a disaster or traumatic event, and includes resources for more information.  Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration

Tips for Talking With and Helping Children and Youth Cope After a Disaster or Traumatic Event     Helps parents and teachers recognize common reactions children of different age groups (preschool and early childhood to adolescence) experience after a disaster or traumatic event. Offers tips for how to respond in a helpful way and when to seek support. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Service.  Administration (SAMHSA)    

Tips for Talking to Children About the Shooting.   New York Times article by Robert Abramovitz, MD.

Tips for Adults on How to  Talk with  Children about Connecticut School Shooting  National Center for School Crisis and Bereavement at Cincinnati Children'[s Hospital Medical Center

Resources in Different Languages

After the Trauma:  Helping My Child Cope  UCLA Center of Mental Health in Schools

Spanish 

Coping with Violence and Traumatic Events    Tips for parents in talking with their children by various age groups in English, Spanish, Chinese, and Japanese.    Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration

Helping Your Child After a Natural Disaster  
        Document available in English, Spanish, Portuguese, Chinese, Korean, Hmong, Haitian Creole, Tagalog, Tongan, Croatian, and Japanese    Translations provided to SSWAA by Melissa Allen Heath,   PhD,      Brigham Young University

How to Deal with Grief.   Explains how to deal with grief as a normal response to loss or death. Describes how grief feels, how long it lasts, the four-step grieving process, and how grief differs from depression. Lists resources for more information.   (SAMHSA)

How to Deal with Grief    (Panjabi)     Punjabi version of KEN01-0104, prompted by a violent incident at a Sikh temple in Wisconsin in August 2012. Explains how to deal with grief as a normal response to loss or death. Describes how grief feels, how long it lasts, the four-step grieving process, and how grief differs from depression. Lists resources for more information.  (SAMHSA)

Talking to Children About Violence   National Association of School Psychologists

Spanish,      Korean 

Tips for Survivors of a Traumatic Event - Managing Your Stress    Gives stress prevention and management tips for dealing with the effects of trauma, mass violence, or terrorism. Lists tips to relieve stress, describes how to know when to seek professional help, and provides accompanying resources.

Tips for Survivors of a Traumatic Event - Managing Your Stress (Punjabi)   Punjabi version of NMH05-0209R, prompted by a violent incident at a Sikh temple in Wisconsin in August 2012.Gives stress prevention and management tips for dealing with the effects of trauma, mass violence, or terrorism. Lists tips to relieve stress, describes how to know when to seek professional help, and provides accompanying resources.

Tips for Talking With and Helping Children and Youth Cope After a Disaster or Traumatic Event     Helps parents and teachers recognize common reactions children of different age groups (preschool and early childhood to adolescence) experience after a disaster or traumatic event. Offers tips for how to respond in a helpful way and when to seek support. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Service.  Administration (SAMHSA)    

Sugerencias para hablar con niños y jóvenes y ayudarlos a hacer frente a un desástre o un evento traumático: una guía para padres, cuidadores y maestros(Spanish)       Contiene preguntas que los consumidores pueden hacerse para ayudarles a decidir si se debe buscar ayuda para un problema de abuso de drogas, de salud mental, o ambas cosas. Urge a los que respondieron "sí" a cualquiera de las preguntas, que busquen ayuda y contiene una lista de recursos dónde pueden obtener más información.  Substance Abuse and Mental Health Service Administration (SAMHSA)

Tips for Talking to Children and Youth After Traumatic Events: A Guide for Parents and Educators (Punjabi)    Punjabi version of KEN01-0093, prompted by a violent incident at a Sikh temple in Wisconsin in August 2012. Helps parents and teachers recognize and address problems in children and teens affected by the trauma after an act of violence. Describes signs of stress reactions that are common in young trauma survivors at different ages, and offers tips on how to help. 

Tips for Talking with (Infants & Toddlers; Pre-school Children; School Age Children; Adolescents) After Disasters   SAMHSA documents available by age and in Spanish, Chinese & Japanese  from  the Department of Education's Readiness & Emergency Management for Schools

Parent Information:  Protecting Your Child From Suicide  (English)   Trauma & Crisis Project from Brigham Young University Spanish 

Responding to Natural Disasters

Help Your Child After a Natural Disaster  (Spanish)  Trauma & Crisis Project from Brigham Young University

Help Your Child After a Natural Disaster  (English)   Trauma & Crisis Project from Brigham Young University

Document also available in  Portuguese, Chinese, Korean, Hmong, Haitian Creole, Tagalog, Tongan, Croatian, and Japanese   Translations provided to SSWAA by Melissa Allen Heath, PhD,  Trauma & Crisis Project at Brigham Young University

Helping Children After a Natural Disaster: Information for Parents and Teachers  Developed by the National Association of School Psychologists. 

Hurricane Tools and Resources.    Resources for parents and caregivers developed by the National Child Traumatic Stress Network 

Preparing Your Family for an Emergency

 Every Minute Counts in disaster.  Make an emergency plan for you and your family.  But preparing for emergencies shouldn't fall on your shoulders alone. Young children and teens alike need to be part of the process — for their own safety and sense of empowerment.

Build a Kit,  Make a Plan,  Get Informed.    FEMA provides guidelines to help your family prepare for an emergency.

"Get Your Kids on Your Team"   Helpful information to involve your kids with emergency preparedness developed by FEMA for kids. 

FEMA provides Family Communication Plans you can complete as a family and keep with you with important contact information as well as suggestions for communication if you are separated.  Family Communication Plan for Kids.     Family Communication Plan for Parents.   

"The Safest Place During a Tornado"     Watch this entertaining and educational video by The Weather Channel.

 

Community Search
Sign In


Forgot your password?

Haven't joined yet?

Calendar
Directory Search

Social Media
    
     How to Use Pinterest